article
Jacinda Ardern take a bow

Jacinda Ardern take a bow

By Clare Sultmann

It was New Zealand’s darkest day. Our friendly, bipartisan neighbour with some of the world’s best scenery and arguably the worlds best sporting team in the All Blacks’ was brought to its knees.

The country where people from all over the world are buying real estate in droves because it’s seen as a safe haven, a place free from terror and conflict suffered the unthinkable. The 15 March 2019 is New Zealand’s darkest day.  We all pretty much know the facts. A white man filled with hate and rage targeting two mosques in Christchurch went on a rampage and with the aid of a semi-automatic took 50 lives that day. Innocents going about their daily routine, hurting no one and keeping to themselves. The plight of the youngest victim a 3-year-old boy who apparently was running towards the gunman makes us want to throw up with rage.

The world reeled from information that was fast escaping this small nation about the atrocities that had occurred. We stood in solidarity with our NZ brothers and sisters and we prayed for peace. We looked to our elected representatives for guidance and leadership. Australian politicians were quick to condemn the attack but it was the New Zealand Prime Minister’s response that has captivated the world. In her opening statement as PM Jacinda Ardern said there would be ‘good days and there would be bad days’.  

The bad day arrived last Friday and it was horrific. Worse than she would have ever have imagined when she mouthed that statement in October 2017.

Resolving to change the gun laws immediately her decisiveness under immense pressure was resolute. As too were her compassion and empathy for the victims and their families. Social media is filled with images of her comforting and I mean really comforting the families of victims. Her concern and care are genuine and heartfelt. Her statements condemning the violence have sent a strong message and her ability to unite a country so clearly shrouded in grief, remarkable.

As one of the news outlets called out: ‘As the leader of NZ she’s shown that the strength of your resolve is in no way related to the size of your country and as a human being she’s shown that you can be decisive without being divisive’.  Indeed she has. Leaders of far greater and powerful nations should look to her actions with admiration and applause.

 

 

Clare Sultmann

Clare Sultmann is a wife, mother of 3 and the founder of Dear Molly.
As a survivor of a catastrophic accident, former barrister at law, published author, and nationally accredited mediator Clare has returned to work in a different capacity. Relocating to Noosa shortly after the birth of her first child, Clare found it difficult to make meaningful and real connections with other like-minded women away from her own network of friends. With this in mind, Clare’s idea was born. Dear Molly aims to provide connections for like-minded women in a real, meaningful and positive manner. It a platform to share, communicate and inspire other women about their ‘real’ life.

Related Articles

Melbourne Cup. The race that stops a nation.

Melbourne Cup. The race that stops a nation.

Like life, any horse on any day can win. The important thing is to show up.

Read more

When Mother’s Day Hurts

When Mother’s Day Hurts

Over the next week will see an abundance of cards, a bevvy of flowers and pretty much every school classroom in Australia hard at work whipping up all manner of crafty delights for the annual event that is Mother’s Day.

Read more

The loss of a great American and humanitarian

The loss of a great American and humanitarian

The death of Senator John McCain, aged 81 to brain cancer is a loss for us all.

No matter what your political persuasion, Republican or Democrat, you have to admire the man for his bravery, his heroism and above all his patriotism- his love for his country and his fellow countrymen.

Read more

COMMENTS

Please login or sign-up to add your comment.


Comments (0):

There are no comments yet.